No shop should be without a jig saw, probably the second most used saw next to a circular saw. They are light weight, versatile saws with a large selection of blades for working on specific materials such as wood, metal and plastics. Both corded and cordless styles are available, with the advent of L-ion batteries you will get a surprisingly long run before having to recharge or change the battery.

 

Corded Jig Saw


dewalt jig saw

Dewalt DW317K Heavy-Duty Compact Jig Saw Kit

Corded saws are available as single and variable speed models, some will include a light to aid in more accurate cuts. Variable speeds will range from 0 to 3000 strokes per minute. Many saws also offer orbital actions to allow faster more agressive cutting that can be set according to the material being cut.

Festool Trion PSB 300 EQ D-Handle Jigsaw with New T-Loc SystainerFestool Trion PSB 300 EQ D-Handle Jigsaw with New T-Loc Systainer
The PSB 300 is a jigsaw with the blade guidance system of a bandsaw. Two side guides and a rear thrust bearing keep the blade tracking straight and perpendicular for unprecedented precision. You’ll be..

Festool Trion PSB 300 EQ D-Handle Jigsaw with New T-Loc Systainer


Rockwell® Blade Runner™ Jig Saw, Multi-Purpose Precision Cutter
Get more bang for your buck with a saw that does it all! This multi-purpose saw makes straight cuts or curved cuts on everything from wood and metal to ceramic tile, plastic, PVC and more. Use it in your shop or take it to your job site - weighs just over 17 lbs. Uses standard T-shank jigsaw blades Change blades in under 3 seconds Attaches to any shop vac for quick cleanup

Rockwell® Blade Runner™ Jig Saw, Multi-Purpose Precision Cutter

Rockwell® Blade Runner™ Jig Saw, Multi-Purpose Precision Cutter
 

 

Cordless Jig Saw


cordless jig saw

Dewalt DC330K Heavy-Duty XRP™ 18V Cordless Jig Saw Kit with Keyless Blade Change

Cordless jig saws have all the features of corded models with the added advantage of not being limited to an available power outlet.18 volt models provide adequate power and long battery life, most brands use a common battery that works on their complete line of tools. 

Jig Saw Blades

There are three basic styles of shanks that fasten the blade to the saw.

tshank
The T-shank is the most common style used in the newer models, it allows for keyless clamping and is held more securily than the older styles.
ushank
The older standard was known as the U-shank, they were locked in the clamp with a set screw.
makitashank
Makita used this type of shank in their older models, it is becoming increasingly hard to find this type.

Jigsaw Blades at Amazon.com 

Jig Saw Accessories

Rockler Speed-Cope Crown Molding Jig
Cut crown and base molding the easy way with this innovative jig. Speed-Cope™ lets you make tricky cope cuts with ease, for perfect molding faster. It adjusts to handle most molding up to 7-1/4'' wide, 45° and 90° inside miters, flat miters, and base, chair, and panel moldings. Includes free do-it-yourself DVD.

Rockler Speed-Cope Crown Molding Jig

Rockler Speed-Cope Crown Molding Jig
EasyCoper for Crown Molding
Take the guesswork out of coping crown molding to create perfect inside corners! Allows you to quickly and easily cope crown molding with a power jig saw instead of a coping saw, reducing wrist, hand and arm stress.

EasyCoper for Crown Molding

EasyCoper for Crown Molding

 

Jig Saw Safety

NOTE: Never use a saw or any power tool while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

Read your owners manual for additional tips and safety features.

1. Wear safety goggles.

2. Tie back loose hair, tuck in long beards, and remove dangling jewelry or watches.

3. Make sure your sleeves are tight at your wrist, wearing long pants is recommended while wood working.

4. Use clamps to secure the cutting material to the work surface.

5. Always unplug and turn off the saw when you are changing or tightening the blade. Select the correct blade for each type of material you are cutting. Make sure your saw cutting speed is set for the type of material you are cutting, slower for metal, faster for wood, see manual for details.

6. Install the blade with the teeth facing the front of the saw.

7. It is best to drill a 3/8 inch pilot hole at the top edge of your circle to properly position your jig saw for cutting. Drill the hole where you want to start cutting and place the blade in the hole.

8. Never start the saw while the blade is touching the wood.

9. Do not start cutting until the blade is running at the proper speed.

10. Check under the cutting surface to make sure you have enough clearance for the blade to go up and down without hitting any thing.

11. Never reach in front of the saw or over the saw while the saw is operating.